An easy way to start drawing (again) …

Exercise one: keep your eyes closed

Close your eyes and take a couple of breaths. With your eyes closed, start looking for colours and shapes.

Next, try to visualise what you saw before you closed your eyes by imagining contours of objects, shadows and highlights.

Exercise two: keep your eyes open

Do the same with your eyes open. Look around. Compare contours, shapes and colours. Notice parallel lines and gradients.

Exercise three: trace in the air

Keep both eyes open and look around. Use a finger to trace contours in the air. Use your thumb and index finger to compare dimensions. Take it easy, don’t squint.

Exercise four: draw on surfaces

Use your finger to draw what you see on different surfaces. Feel the difference between materials but keep looking at the subject.

Don’t forget to stop when you get bored!

Art Experience Design.

Art experience (AX) encompasses all aspects of the public’s interactions with art and the organisation.

AX designers work where organisations, art and the public intersect.

The 3P model.
The 3P model.

A pragmatic model to focus your art practice.

P1 stands for Private, and is the space you should spend most of your time. Its core concepts are personal and processes.

P2 means Public — this is where you show your art to peers and in (online) presentations. You come here to get feedback and input.

P3 or Product is what distracts you from the other Ps by wasting your time on promotion or portfolios.

I like this quote from John Armstrong’s How to Worry Less about Money:

At present, people define themselves as being ‘interested in art’. Then they go to art school, develop their ideas and later seek exhibitions. Galleries seek saleable work and try to promote artists. Collectors follow their own inclinations and, for whatever reasons they may have, make the careers of certain artists by buying their work. At some point, public institutions endorse and eventually canonize a few artists as highly important. Along the way there are various publicity mechanisms — reviews in newspapers, interviews in magazines, and so on. Somewhere in the background there are debates about the nature and value of art.